Deo

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A famous singer of the Golden Era of the Brazilian Song, Deo recorded 136 78 rpm albums with 263 songs. In 1933, he moved with his family to São Paulo SP. As he loved to sing tangos, he looked for Maestro…
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A famous singer of the Golden Era of the Brazilian Song, Deo recorded 136 78 rpm albums with 263 songs.

In 1933, he moved with his family to São Paulo SP. As he loved to sing tangos, he looked for Maestro Gaó, who was the artistic director of Rádio Cruzeiro do Sul. After an audition, he began to sing tangos at that outing. Already as Deo, he was hired by Rádio Record, where he began to sing Brazilian music, mainly Sílvio Caldas's songs, until abandoning the tango in 1936. In that year, he recorded "Vendedora de Flores" (José Marcílio) and "Cantando" (João Pacífico) for Columbia. In 1937, he became friends with Ary Barroso, who brought him to Odeon, where Deo recorded the Ary Barroso samba "Viver Assim Não É Vida" and the marcha which made him famous in Rio, "Casta Suzana" (Ary Barroso/Alcir Pires Vermelho), in 1938; the latter became a hit in the 1939 Carnival.

In December 1939, Deo recorded the hits "Vem, Amor" (Ataulfo Alves/Raul Longras) and "Princesinha" (Malfitano/Frazão). He wrote "Súplica" (lyrics by Otávio Gabus Mendes), recorded with success by Orlando Silva in 1940; the other side of Orlando's album had "Coqueiro Velho" (Fernandinho/José Marcílio), one of Deo's non-credited songs. "Não Me Procures Mais" (with lyrics by Mário Rossi) was another original recorded by Deo. During the early '40s, Deo recorded 12 albums through Odeon (Rio) and also performed in the Rádio Nacional. When he moved to Rio in 1941, Ary Barroso brought him to Rádio Tupi. In 1942, impeded by Odeon's director Mr. Strauss from recording Ataulfo Alves's "Ai, Que Saudades da Amélia" (was too slow for the Carnival, according to Strauss), Deo saw that the song would achieve enormous success in the composer's recording. Breaking with Odeon, he signed with Columbia, where he would remain until 1943, when he moved to Continental. In 1944, he had great success with Ary Barroso's "Terra Seca." In 1954, he was invited to be the artistic director of the Radio recording company, where he remained until its closing in 1961. In the next year, he occupied the same functions at the Estúdio F company. His last recorded performance was the re-recording for the sambas "Alô, Pandeiro" and "E O Cinqüenta E Seis Não Veio," both by Haroldo Lobo/Wilson Batista, included in the História da Música Popular Brasileira series (Abril Cultural).