Count Prince Miller

b. c.1948, Jamaica, West Indies. In the early 60s, Miller was initially a baritone singer, singing with the Downbeats. He learnt his craft performing on the hotel circuit on the north coast of Jamaica.…
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Artist Biography

b. c.1948, Jamaica, West Indies. In the early 60s, Miller was initially a baritone singer, singing with the Downbeats. He learnt his craft performing on the hotel circuit on the north coast of Jamaica. His reputation led to his being enrolled to perform with Jimmy James And The Vagabonds, joining the group in the UK. The band released a number of singles, including ‘Red Red Wine’ prior to Tony Tribe’s reggae version of the Neil Diamond classic. The song gave the group their only UK Top 40 hit in 1968 and it was not until 1976 that they returned to the chart. After Miller departed from the group he became more involved in the UK reggae scene. He appeared at the Wembley Reggae Festival in 1971, the recording of which was planned as a live album by Trojan Records, but the project faltered. Undeterred, the label persevered, and a live album was successfully recorded at Alexandra Palace featuring the Pioneers, Greyhound, Nicky Thomas, Delroy Wilson, Bruce Ruffin, and compèred by Miller. In 1971, he had recorded a novelty hit for the label, ‘Mule Train Parts One And Two’, which he performed at the show. Further releases included ‘Bewildered’ and a comment on man’s follies, ‘The Monkey’. He also performed alongside his compatriot Danny Ray and was instrumental in securing the singer a contract with MCA Records. In 1974, as a soloist, he released ‘Call Me’ on the Trojan subsidiary Ashanti. His reputation as an MC led to his introducing a number of top Jamaican artists, including the Rainbow Theatre performance of the Jamaica Showcase in 1974, featuring Al Brown, Dennis Brown, Cynthia Richards and Sharon Forrester. He was also invited to introduce Bob Marley And The Wailers at the same theatre in June 1977. The event was filmed and has the distinction of being the first official reggae video. In the early 80s, he re-recorded ‘Mule Train’ with Sly And Robbie, reviving his popularity as a performer. He continued to whip up enthusiasm at live events, and pursued his aspirations towards an acting career. By the 90s, his determination resulted in a role in the popular television situation comedy Desmond’s. In 1996 he returned to the studios to produce Jimmy James and Winston Curtis’ ‘Muriel’.