Chuck & Dobby

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The duo of Chuck Josephs and Dobby Dobson unleashed a stream of Jamaican hit singles at the dawn of the '60s, helping popularize the new ska style. Josephs' background is a mystery; Dobson, however, arrived…
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The duo of Chuck Josephs and Dobby Dobson unleashed a stream of Jamaican hit singles at the dawn of the '60s, helping popularize the new ska style. Josephs' background is a mystery; Dobson, however, arrived via the island's talent show circuit. In 1960, the two paired up and cut their debut single, "Cool School," for Duke Reid. An instant hit, it was followed by the popular "Til the End of Time," with the smash "Oh Fanny" and "Running Around" arriving in the new year. All four songs were picked up by Blue Beat for British release. The duo then moved on, linking up with Prince Buster for "I Was Wrong" and Coxsone Dodd, for whom they cut "I Love My Teacher" and the exuberant "Du Du Wap," both sizable hits. Future Jamaican Prime Minister Edward Seaga oversaw a clutch of successful singles in 1961 as well, "Sweeter Than Honey" being the biggest of a batch that also included "Lovey Dovey," "Sitting Square," and "Sad Over You." Blue Beat continued to release Chuck & Dobby's records in the U.K., although the Seaga productions were licensed to the Starlite label. More 45s followed, with the last, "Tell Me Pretty Baby" and "I'm Going Home," arriving courtesy of Duke Reid in 1964. Chuck & Dobby then went their separate ways. Dobson launched a very successful solo career, while Josephs joined forces with Joe White for a further string of Sonia Pottinger-produced hits in the mid-'60s. In 1970, he reappeared on disc under the alias Chuck Berry, Jr., with a trio of songs overseen by Lee Perry, all of which appeared on the British Spinning Wheel label. The singer then disappeared off the musical radar.