Carl Brisson

b. Carl Pederson, 24 December 1895, Copenhagen, Denmark, d. 26 September 1958, Copenhagen, Denmark. A stylish and romantic singer, actor and dancer in the musical theatre and films, Brisson was an up-and-coming…
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Artist Biography

b. Carl Pederson, 24 December 1895, Copenhagen, Denmark, d. 26 September 1958, Copenhagen, Denmark. A stylish and romantic singer, actor and dancer in the musical theatre and films, Brisson was an up-and-coming boxer before making his stage debut as a dancer while in his teens. He moved to England in 1921 where he appeared in vaudeville revues, and had leading roles in revivals of The Merry Widow (1923) and The Dollar Princess (1925), before enjoying great success with two European imports, The Apache (1927) and Wonder Bar (1930). However, his reputation as something of a matinée idol is based mainly on his films, many recordings, and cabaret work. After making some early talking pictures in Britain, in 1934 Brisson went to Hollywood to star in the screen adaptation of Earl Carroll’s hit stage musical, Murder At The Vanities, in which he introduced the song that was to become his theme tune, ‘Cocktails For Two’ (Sam Coslow -Arthur Johnston). A year later, he took the lead in two more US films, Ship’s Café and All The King’s Horses. In the latter he co-starred with the American actress Mary Ellis, and sang another number that became identified with him, ‘A Little White Gardenia’ (Coslow). In 1936 Brisson made his sole foray onto the New York musical stage in Sigmund Romberg and Otto Harbach’s operetta, Forbidden Melody. He subsequently devoted himself to international cabaret appearances, and was knighted by the kings of Denmark and Sweden.