Bororo

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Son of a famous Bohemian who left 3,000 written satires, Sinhôzinho, Bororó learned the violão (acoustic guitar) from him. Bororó had his nickname given by his school teacher, after a group of Bororo…
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Son of a famous Bohemian who left 3,000 written satires, Sinhôzinho, Bororó learned the violão (acoustic guitar) from him. Bororó had his nickname given by his school teacher, after a group of Bororo Indians visited his house. Ever since he was very young, he used to sing modinhas with lyrics by Castro Alves, Casimiro de Abreu, Gonçalves Crespo, and Melo Morais Filho. Regularly playing serenatas with the best musicians of his time, he was close friends with João Pernambuco, Quincas Laranjeiras, Gustavo Ribeiro, Rogério Guimarães, Américo Jacomino (the Canhoto), and Henrique Flauta. As a boy, he wrote songs for ranchos (Carnival groups) like the Flor da Estopa, Lírio do Amor, and Mimosas Cravinas. He only wrote a few songs, but they have remained all-time classics. His big hit was "Da Cor do Pecado," first recorded by Sílvio Caldas in 1939. Another great hit was "Curare," recorded by Orlando Silva in 1940 and later, Rosa Passos. "O Que É O Que É" (with Evrágio Lopes) also had success in Sílvio Caldas's recording. He published the book Gente da Madrugada: Flagrantes da Vida Noturna (Guavira Editores, Rio de Janeiro, 1982), accounting passages of his Bohemian life.