Deena Webster

Tuesday's Child

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The influences of early Joan Baez, Judy Collins, Marianne Faithfull, and Sandy Denny echo heavily on Deena Webster's obscure 1968 British LP Tuesday's Child. Emphasizing high-voiced and earnest interpretations of contemporary songs by Donovan, Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Tom Paxton, and the Bee Gees, there's also a hint of folk-pop orchestration in some of the arrangements. "Hurry, Tuesday Child" almost sounds like something Scott Walker could have sung in the late 1960s, though far more often the production has a plainer tone, and is on occasion fairly stark traditional folk. Of course, at least part of the reason this album is so obscure is that, despite the similarities to the aforementioned folk legends, Webster's voice isn't nearly as good or distinct as the vocals of Denny, Faithfull, Collins, or Baez. It's still pleasant period mid-'60s folk (actually slightly retro by the time of its 1968 release) for genre specialists. Considering how often the song was covered, "The House of the Rising Sun" is a surprising standout, Webster's haunted voice and acoustic guitar backed only by a spooky organ.