Hombres G

Desayuno Continental

  • AllMusic Rating
    6
  • User Ratings (0)
  • Your Rating

AllMusic Review by

One of the most successful acts in the history of Spanish pop, Hombres G came back in 2002 after a ten-year hiatus. Desayuno Continental is their third proper studio album since then, and the first to be released independently, with the band having cut ties with Warner after an association of 24 years and close to 20 million albums sold in Spain and Latin America. Desayuno Continental is a collection of ten new songs that continue Hombres G's efforts to distance themselves from the juvenile imprint that was their trademark. Produced by Carlos Jean, Desayuno Continental has a harder edge than the typical bland pop Hombres G will always be associated with, with plenty of electric guitar solos and little place for the by turns hilarious/embarrassing sense of humor that earned the band its millions of fans, as well as its many detractors. Hombres G still enjoy widespread popularity in Spain, with their longtime supporters arguing that the band's newfound maturity should finally convince all of Hombres G's mastery of the pop craft, rather than being perpetually considered a novelty act. Yet, the obvious fact remains that Hombres G minus their endearing goofiness are just another competent Spanish pop band. The new songs are not bad, but they are undeniably generic, whereas -- for better or for worse and precisely because of their kitsch attitude and wacky lyrics -- Hombres G used to be unique. An honorary exception is "Separados," a truly beautiful song that marries the best lyric and melody of the album with an inspired guest vocal by Bebe, whose weary, longing voice brings a much welcome variety to this continental breakfast table. Desayuno Continental is an eminently professional Spanish pop record that will certainly please fans of the band or of the genre. Casual listeners, on the other hand, will be hard-pressed to find any telling differences between the new Hombres G and any number of Spanish (or even Mexican) pop bands such as Taxi, Amaral, and El Canto del Loco, all bands that can be rightfully considered to be Hombres G descendants -- but now, in an ironic twist of fate, it appears that it's Hombres G who are trying to sound like their children.

blue highlight denotes track pick