Cotillon

Cotillon

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AllMusic Review by

Some folks run away to an exotic land to get away from heartbreak; Jordan Corso took another approach, writing a bunch of songs about his busted romance and quitting his day job to bring them to the world. After cutting a pair of well-received EPs, Corso's project Cotillion has released its self-titled debut album, with lo-fi rock and cool, reserved new-new wave to '70s-style pop and slinky R&B complete with howling saxophone. Though Corso doesn't exactly sound like the standard-issue man on these sessions, in the grand tradition of Jonathan Richman and Jad Fair, he comes off as a guy with a true heart he's not afraid to share, and he's a lot more tuneful (and less socially awkward) than either of them. Corso is looking for love on most of Cotillion's 12 tunes, and manages to sound ardent without coming off as desperate, eager to save some woman from a heel with bad shoes in "Call Me Up," and calling out a former girlfriend who did him wrong on "Left Bank," and while the themes are similar throughout, Corso puts enough fresh spins on them that the album doesn't wear out its welcome, largely thanks to Corso's simple but confident melodic sense. JR White, formerly of Girls, produced the album, and in his hands (and with the help of a handful of talented musicians), the results sound just polished enough to honor Corso's influences while holding on to enough grit to make these songs sound thoroughly human, and more honestly compelling for it. It's an open question what Jordan Corso would sound like a few years into a satisfying relationship, but his escape from a bad one has helped make Cotillion into a charming and pleasurable example of high-quality indie pop.

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